New York Mets 2018 Top 50 Prospects

New York Mets Top 50 Prospects for 2018

Written in collaboration with Michael Mayer.  Follow us on Twitter at @mikemayerMMO and @mikeh1680.

The 2017 New York Mets tried to follow up 2 playoff seasons with a 3rd consecutive trip in 2017 however that did not materialize and they were forced to trade pieces off with an eye on 2018. Sadly, there is not much help in the minors. After graduating the top 2 prospects from our 2017 list (Amed Rosario and Dominic Smith) there is no clear upper echelon prospect in the current system and the Mets have one of the worst rated systems in all of baseball. The surprising re-hiring of Omar Minaya should hopefully start changing that in the right direction.

The success (or lack of) of the 2018 Mets will have an effect on how this list looks next year. If they struggle once again and have to trade pieces off there will be some new additions to this list. Unfortunately due to the lack of quality prospects in the organization it has been tough to trade for better ML talent and will continue to be that way for the foreseeable future.

Prospects1500 Tiers:
Tier 1: Players with high expectations of both making the majors and playing at an All-Star level for a number of years
Tier 2: Players with an above average expectation of making the majors and being a solid contributor
Tier 3: Players with an average expectation of making the majors and being a solid contributor
Tier 4: Players who have the potential of making the majors, or have high likelihood of making the majors but providing minimal impact (e.g. middle reliever, low-ceiling UT guys)
Tier 5: Players who are worth keeping an eye on, but likely to never make a team’s 40-man roster






Tier 1:

None

Tier 2:
1. Andres Gimenez, SS
Age: 19
2017: Columbia (Low-A): .265/.346/.349, 9 2B, 4 3B, 4 HR, 22 SB, 28 BB, 61 K
Blessed with great athleticism his best attributes may end up being his defense and ability to hit for a high average. There is still time to develop some power however he will not want to compromise the contact he is making and his speed should lead to extra infield hits if he continues to hit more line drives and ground balls as opposed to swinging for the fences. While is speed is adequate he should settle into the 15-20 SB tier, which is beneficial based on the scarcity of SB at this home run era of baseball. Gimenez has a short, compact swing that should lead to some decent “gap power”. As his body matures that could potentially lead to a small uptick in HR’s although settling into the 10-15 HR range may be his upside in this category. Defensively Gimenez appears to have all the skills to stick at shortstop however with Amed Rosario hopefully manning that position for the foreseeable future a move to 2B may be beneficial as there is no clear future at that position for the Mets.

2. David Peterson, LHP
Age: 22
2017: Brooklyn (Short-A): 3.2 IP, 4 H, 1 R, 1 ER (2.45 ERA), 1 BB, 6 K
The Mets 2017 1st round draft pick out of Oregon is a 6’6” lefthander who comes at hitters with a ¾ delivery and a 3-pitch arsenal while relying on his control as opposed to overpowering hitters with speed. He will reach the 94-95 MPH range with his fastball however he will mainly sit in the 88-92 MPH range throughout his starts. After simplifying his windup while at Oregon to minimize his movement he flourished. His slider and changeup are a work in progress however they should become plus pitches for him in the future. Peterson is also has a curveball in his repertoire that he is working on that will add something to his arsenal. While he struck out a lot of hitters in college, Peterson projects as a contact/ground ball pitcher in the pros and his command will be his biggest strength. Peterson could round into a good #3 starter in the majors.

3. Mark Vientos, SS
Age: 18
2017: GCL Mets (Rookie): .259/.316/.397, 12 2B, 0 3B, 4 HR, 2 SB, 14 BB, 42 K / Kingsport (Rookie): .294/.333/.412, 2 2B, 0 3B, 0 HR, 1 BB, 4 K
Vientos, the Mets 2017 2nd round pick, while currently playing SS profiles more as a prototypical 3B power bat. As he develops his 6’4” frame should fill out from its current 190 lbs and his already apparent power should develop into a good asset for years to come. He has an advanced approach at the plate for his age even while they are still developing. His swing can be a bit on the long side and certain holes can be exposed although this could improve as time goes by. Defensively he profiles with below average range yet a strong arm, which will help a transition to 3B.

4. Peter Alonso, 1B
Age: 23
2017: St. Lucie (High-A): .286/.361/.516, 23 2B, 0 3B, 16 HR, 4 SB, 25 BB, 64 K / Binghamton (Double-A): .311/.340/.578, 4 2B, 1 3B, 2 HR, 0 SB, 2 BB, 7 K
This 6’2” 225 lb right handed hitter has an elite power tool that, if developed properly, could turn into a traditional middle of the order slugger. Alonso makes Mets fans dream of a potential home grown slugger that Queens has not seen since the likes of Daryl Strawberry. All indications (like most sluggers) are that he is a bit pull happy and the Mets will try and get him to use his power to all fields. Alonso hits LHP way better than RHP and will need to improve his splits in order to reach his full potential. While his 2017 ISO numbers were a career low (.231) it was 2nd in the Florida State League. His strikeout rate was a career high as well in A ball (18.5) yet improved when he was promoted to AA (14.9). The piece of his game that needs the most improvement is his defense. While not a direct fantasy issue if it costs him playing time his value will clearly suffer. There seems to be a wide range between floor and ceiling for Alonso as if all comes together he could be a quality middle of the order bat or he could be stuck on the short side of an AL platoon.

5. Justin Dunn, RHP
Age: 21
2017: St. Lucie (High-A): 20 G (16 GS), 95.1 IP, 101 H, 66 R, 53 ER (5.00 ERA), 48 BB, 75 K
The Mets went to the college ranks for their first pick in the 2016 draft and grabbed Boston College’s Dunn. Unfortunately, 2017 was a down year for Dunn and he will need to show improvement in 2018 in order to raise his stock to that level again. While he does possess a live fastball that touches the 96 MPH range regularly his velocity is a bit down from the 99 he threw in college. Couple his performance with a shoulder injury that shortened his season he may now be seem more of a relief pitcher, where with his live arm he could most likely move through the system quite quickly. With this being said, there is still time for Dunn to reach the potential he does have.

6. Desmond Lindsay, OF
2017: .220/.327/.388, 10 2B, 1 3B, 8 HR, 4SB, 33 BB, 77 K
Age: 21
A high upside OF with tons of tools had a forgettable 2017, hitting .220 and an uptick in his strikeout rate from 19.4% to 30.7% that again was marred by injuries. It has been hard to project what Lindsay may become mainly because he has had a hard time staying healthy and on the field. His 2017 was cut short by elbow surgery that and has sadly only logged 137 games in 3 years. Currently playing CF he may settle in a LF position based on his below average throwing arm. Lindsay was once viewed as a 5 tool player however he only was able to steal 4 bases last year. His power projects as plus so there is certainly potential for Lindsay to still become a fixture in the Mets lineup of the future.

7. Thomas Szapucki, LHP
Age: 21
2017: Columbia (Low-A): 29.0 IP, 24 H, 10 R, 9 ER (2.79 ERA), 10 BB, 27 K
Once he got on the mound, Szapucki was proving why he was once viewed as the Mets #1 prospect. Sadly that euphoria ended quickly when he was again put on the shelf and eventually ended up having Tommy John surgery that will most likely keep him completely off the mound during the 2018 season. Armed with a live, mid 90’s fastball that tops out at 97, Szapucki also possesses a plus curveball with above average spin rate and was developing a changeup that was a work in progress. Hopefully Szapucki bucks the trend of Mets pitchers recoveries from Tommy John surgery and returns healthy in 2019.

8. Marcos Molina, RHP
Age: 21
2017: St. Lucie (High-A): 28.2 IP, 17 H, 6 R, 4 ER (1.26), 5 BB, 23 K / Binghamton (Double-A): 78.0 IP, 77 H, 37 R, 34 ER (3.92 ERA), 21 BB, 63 K
One year removed from Tommy John surgery Molina put up solid numbers at both A and AA in 2017 posting and impressive 1.26 ERA at St. Lucie (High A). He also put up a respectable 3.92 ERA in AA Binghamton. A bit of a concern is the apparent change in the “stuff” that Molina throws. He lost a few MPH on his fastball post surgery and while it is possible the MPH returns this year, after a full year of recovery, it is also possible that this is the “new norm” for Molina. This reduction in velocity contributed to a reduction in K rate from his previous career numbers. 2018 will be a huge indication to the Mets as to what Molina’s future will look like.

9. Chris Flexen, RHP
Age: 23
2017: St. Lucie (High-A): 12.2 IP, 12 H, 6 R, 3 ER (2.13 ERA), 3 BB, 13 K / Binghamton (Double-A): 48.2 IP, 28 H, 10 R, 9 ER (1.66 ERA), 7 BB, 50 K / NYM (MLB): 48.0 IP, 62 H, 44 R, 42 ER (7.88 ERA), 35 BB, 36 K
Flexen made his MLB debut last summer due to injuries on the Mets staff and had a debut that we would all like to forget, so we will. Looking past that Flexen totally dominated A and AA hitters so much that he completely skipped AAA. Flexen’s fastball sits in the mid-low 90’s and his best pitch may be his slider. A curveball and developing changeup round out his arsenal. He should start the season in the rotation at AAA and make a return appearance to Queens at some point this summer.

Tier 3:
10. Tomas Nido, C
Age: 23
2017: Binghamton (Double-A): .232/.287/.354, 19 2B, 1 3B, 8 HR, 0/0 SB, 30 BB, 63 K / NYM (MLB): .300/.300/.400, 1 2B, 0 3B, 0 HR, 0/0 SB, 0 BB, 2 K
Looking to build off of a 2016 batting title that saw him hit .320 the Mets saw Nido’s batting average take a huge fall down to .232 at AA. Interestingly enough Nido’s best tool seemed to be his power so the settling batting average should be somewhere in the middle. Nido made a brief cameo in the majors and went 3-10. An improved approach and eye at the plate was a positive in 2017. Nido’s defense is stellar and may be a big reason he could accumulate some big at bats in the future.

11. Anthony Kay, LHP
Age: 22
2017: Did not play
The Mets lost Kay for the 2017 season due to our ever increasing familiarity with Tommy John surgery after drafting him with their 2nd, 1st round pick in the 2017 draft. When he returns in 2018 the former UConn hurler has plenty of potential to be a middle of the rotation performer. The 6’0” LHP has a fastball that sits in the low 90’s yet supplements it with a quality changeup and a pre-surgery improving curveball. This will still be the expectation in 2018.

12. Luis Guillorme, 2B/SS
Age: 22
2017: Binghamton (Double-A): .283/.376/.331, 20 2B, 0 3B, 1 HR, 4SB, 72 BB, 55 K
While Guillorme is an electric fielder and one of the best defenders in all of the minors he has hit for a respectable average at every level. Without much power to speak of Guillorme is an “old school” shortstop who is a slash hitter although he does not possess much speed. His defense may earn him a role on a ML team however he will have to certainly hit to keep that role consistent. In the current baseball climate, his lack of power may keep that from happening.

13. Ronny Mauricio, SS
Age: 16
2017 Highest Level: N/A
A 16-year-old International signing Mauricio is at least 4 years away from a possible visit to Queens. He projects to have 20+ homer potential once he grows into his body. While not possessing much speed, Mauricio does have an above average hit tool.

14. Tyler Bashlor, RHP
Age: 23
2017: St. Lucie (High-A): 35.0 IP, 33 H, 21 R, 19 ER (4.89), 21 BB, 61 K / Binghamton (Double-A): 14.2 IP, 7 K, 0 R, 0 ER (0.00 ERA), 4 BB, 23 K
After Tommy John surgery cost him his 2014 and 2015 seasons Bashlor’s live arm and fantastic K (61 K’s in 35 IP in A ball) rate have the Mets hoping he could be a back of the bullpen staple in the years to come.

15. P.J. Conlon, LHP
Age: 24
2017 Highest Level: AA
Conlon is a soft tossing “crafty” lefty who coming off a fantastic 2016 took at first glance what appears to take a step backwards in 2017 however he had a tale of two seasons. His first half left something to be desired yet he rebounded strong in the second half to finish with respectable numbers and reaffirm his prospect status. If his development continues Conlon could be a #3 starter after failing at an attempt to win a bullpen job in 2017 Spring Training.

16. Patrick Mazeika, C
Age: 24
2017 Highest Level: AA
Mazeika’s hitting tool is clearly his best tool which shows in his .311 career average. His defense is not his strong point and may keep him from getting meaningful ab’s. Mazeika will try to hone his craft. Sadly his season ended in August due to an injury yet he should be ready for Spring Training.

17. Corey Oswalt, RHP
Age: 24
2017 Highest Level: AA
Oswalt will head to AAA after a very successful year at AA where he pitched to a 2.28 ERA and 1.18 WHIP. He also did strike out 119 batters in 134 innings. If successful at AAA, Oswalt could become a decent back of the end rotation option for the Mets going forward.

18. David Thompson, 3B
Age: 24
2017: Binghamton (Double-A): .263/.325/.429, 29 2B, 1 3B, 16 HR, 8SB, 40 BB, 92 K
When Thompson was drafted his best apparent tool was his power. Over the years that has changed and while his power is still something that is a positive his hit tool seems to be the one that could help him make it to Queens.

19. Nabil Crismatt, RHP
Age: 23
2017 Highest Level: A+
Crismatt, an International Free Agent, has made steady progress through the Mets minor league system. Pitching at High A he pitched to a 3.95 ERA with a WHIP of 1.36. These numbers were dramatically hurt by a second half ERA of 5.74.

20. Gerson Bautista, RHP
Age: 22
2017 Highest Level: A+
Acquired from the Red Sox in the Addison Reed trade, Bautista comes to the Mets with a fastball that touched 100 MPH and an above average slider. His 10.52 K rate shows he can certainly miss a bat. If his get his control issues handled he could be a quality piece at the back end of the bullpen.

21. Jordan Humphreys, RHP
Age: 21
2017 Highest Level: A+
Humphreys came out of the gate on fire in 2017 opening the season 10-1, 1.79 ERA and striking out 83 hitters in 80.2 IP while only walking 12. Sadly the former 18th round pick got hurt mid-season and had to have Tommy John surgery that will cause him to miss the entire 2018 season.

22. Drew Smith, RHP
Age: 24
2017 Highest Level: AAA
Acquired for Lucas Duda, Smith possesses a huge arm that can hit 98-99. While he has good control, his fastball is a bit flat and does not lead to a lot of strikeouts. Interesting stat that in 139.2 career IP he has given up only 2 HR. Smith also has a plus curveball. If he continues to trend upward he could carve out a role in the bullpen sooner rather than later.

23. Kevin Kaczmarski, OF
Age: 26
2017 Highest Level: AA
Kaczmarski hit a respectable .274 with a .370 OBP yet only slugged .369 in AA. He should head to AAA this year. No skill really jumps off the page however when he plays, he puts up decent numbers. Could be a 4th OF if things break right.





Tier 4:
24. Phillip Evans, 2B/3B/OF
Age: 25
2017 Highest Level: MLB
Evans was removed from the 40-man roster after the season to create some flexibility however he was re-signed to a minor league contract. He comes to the dish swinging and does not walk or strikeout much. Evans profiles as a Joe McEwing type role player.

25. Juan Uriarte , C
Age: 20
2017 Highest Level: Rookie
Uriarte is a superior defender that could see a pro roster based on this alone. With that being said Uriarte had a breakout offensive season hitting .305. and hits well to all fields. Uriarte should see the lions share of the catching duty in Brooklyn (A) this year.

26. Gavin Cecchini, 2B
Age: 24
2017 Highest Level: MLB
While Cecchini has a great pedigree, the logjam in the Mets infield and the presence of some other prospects in the organization that have higher ceilings, I sadly do not see Cecchini playing a major roll on the Mets this year or any time in the near future. When evaluating Cecchini there are some nice numbers however the skill set he possesses does not scream “STAR!” by any stretch of the imagination. He should hit for a decent average however he has limited power, limited speed, and is doesn’t really have a good position in the field. Being a below average defender will limit his AB’s as much as his offensive limitations. He could be a productive bat off the bench if he can “wear a few more gloves” however the Mets have a variety of players that can play multiple positions on the infield.

27. Christian James, RHP
Age: 19
2017 Highest Level: Rookie
The 19-year-old James had a decent season in his 2nd year of pro ball and has pitched to a 9.5 K/9 throughout his career.

28. Adonis Uceta, RHP
Age: 23
2017 Highest Level: AA
Uceta spent his 2017 between 3 levels and had an exceptional season pitching to a 1.51 ERA and 67 K’s in 59.2 IP. Uceta has the look of a potential shut down reliever if his path remains true.

29. Jamie Callahan, RHP
Age: 23
2017 Highest Level: MLB
Another arm acquired in the Addisson Reed trade from Boston Callahan had a brief call-up with the Mets in September. A two-pitch pitcher, Callahan has been pretty effective and should be in line for some innings in the Majors at some point in 2018.

30. Adrian Hernandez, OF
Age: 16
2017 Highest Level: N/A
An International signing at only 16, Hernandez has a long way to go before he even sniffs the big leagues although his plus power and speed are already apparent.

31. Gregory Guerrero, 2B
Age: 19
2017 Highest Level: Rookie
The nephew of future Hall of Famer Vladimir Guerrero has struggled to show the potential the Mets saw when they gave him a $1.5M bonus on July 2, 2015. Recently turned 19-year-old still has the raw skills to become a quality infield prospect that likely ends up at third or second base.

32. Jeff McNeil, 2B/IF/OF
Age: 25
2017 Highest Level: AAA
Athletic utility man that can play infield and outfield with his best spot being second base. Above average speed and career .372 OBP gives him the offensive skills that could make him a useful bench piece in the near future. Injuries have limited him to only 51 games over the past two seasons.

33. Jhoan Urena, OF
Age: 23
2017 Highest Level: AAA
He finally bounced back from hamate injuries to both wrists to post an .801 OPS in the pitcher friendly Florida State League. Got his first experience in both corner outfield spots in 2017 as well as playing both corner infield spots. Set career-highs in doubles (34), home runs (14) and 18 (stolen bases). Below average defender at each defensive spot.

34. Quinn Brodey, OF
Age: 22
2017 Highest Level: A
The Mets’ third round 2017 draft pick struggled in his pro debut with .657 OPS and 63 strikeouts in 210 at-bats. The former pitcher shows solid instincts as a corner outfielder and his good swing mechanics should lead to a better sophomore season.

35. Harol Gonzalez, RHP
Age: 22
2017 Highest Level: A+
Despite lower strikeouts numbers in 2017 the young right-gander still posted a solid 3.53 ERA in 23 starts in 2017. He was better in the second half after he fought off minor lingering injuries. Fastball in low 90’s (added few ticks consistently last season) and a solid breaking ball makes him a possible SP5.

36. Wagner Lagrange, OF
Age: 22
2017 Highest Level: Short Season A
Lack of range limits him to corner outfielder where his currently below average power doesn’t profile him as a starter. Slashed .330/.379/.460 in 2017 and made a ton of hard contact while striking out only 26 times.

37. Cameron Planck, RHP
Age: 19
2017 Highest Level: Did Not Play
The 19-year-old has yet to throw a pro pitch is coming off shoulder surgery but is expected to pitch in 2018. Mets gave him a $1M signing bonus in 2016 in part due to an above average fastball that touched 96 MPH in high school.

38. Jacob Rhame, RHP
Age: 24
2017 Highest Level: MLB
Hard thrower came to the Mets in exchange for Curtis Granderson this past season. Lack of quality secondary pitch showed Rhame to become hittable in limited MLB experience. Improved control helped him post a fantastic 6.60 K/BB in the minors.

39. Chris Viall, RHP
Age: 22
2017 Highest Level: Short Season A
The big right-hander (6’9″) has an equally large fastball in the upper 90’s that is his out pitch. Stressful mechanics could lead the 22-year-old to the bullpen in the near-future. He did have 31 strikeouts and allowed only 17 hits in 26.1 innings last season.

40. Stephen Nogosek, RHP
Age: 23
2017 Highest Level: A+
The Red Sox sixth round pick from 2016 struggled for the St. Lucie Mets after coming over in the Addison Reed trade. Rare reliever that throws four pitches struck out 10.1 per nine innings last season.

41. Mickey Jannis, RHP
Age: 30
2017 Highest Level: AA
It’s odd to see a 30-year-old on a prospect list however after reinventing himself as a knuckleball pitcher, Jannis may still have some upside which was apparent by a strong second half including his 1.64 ERA in August.





Tier 5:
42. Bryce Hutchinson, RHP
Age: 19
2017 Highest Level: Rookie
While the results were not evident to start, Hutchinson, if things work out in his favor could end up being a gem. Armed with a high 90’s fastball he could eventually turn into a #3 starter.

43. Luis Santana, 2B
Age: 18
2017 Highest Level: Rookie
After hitting .325 with 16 SB in the Dominican Summer league this 18-year-old seems to have some potential and room to grow.

44. David Roseboom, LHP
Age: 25
2017 Highest Level: AAA
Roseboom only pitched 17 innings in 2017 due to injury after a stellar 2016. If he returns to form post injury he could potentially see some innings in the Mets bullpen this year.

45. Shervyen Newton, SS
Age: 18
2017 Highest Level: Rookie
A huge step forward was taken by the 18-year-old Newton in 2017 after raising his batting average .169 in 2016 to .311. He will try to build on that in 2018.

46. Austin McGeorge, LHP
Age: 23
2017 Highest Level: A+
McGeorge had a great year in 2017 pitching to a 1.78 ERA and 11.7 K/9 while using a well above average slider to generate tons of ground balls.

47. Steve Villines, RHP
Age: 22
2017 Highest Level: Short Season A
Villines has a live arm and will most likely head to AA to build on his successful 2017 campaign where he pitched to a 1.65 ERA and 41 K in 27.1 IP.

48. Matt Blackham, RHP
Age: 25
2017 Highest Level: A
Blackman returned to the mound in 2017 after missing the entire 2016 campaign and picked up where he left off pitching using an exceptional curve ball to pitch to a high K rate.

49. Ali Sanchez, C
Age: 21
2017 Highest Level: A
While remaining a top flight defender, Sanchez’s once promising offensive abilities have taken a hit due to 2 injury plagued years. Keeping Sanchez on the field will go a long way in indicating what his future may be.

50. Colin Holderman, RHP
Age: 22
2017 Highest Level: A
Holderman took a step backward in 2017 after a respectable 3.86 ERA in 2016. He will most likely return to A ball and try and repeat some of the 2017 numbers he had.

1 Comment

  1. No Becerra or Luis Carpio? I understand they were left off the 40 man this year, however I’m surprised to see them both off the top 50.

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